Abberly Place Apartment Homes

500 Abberly Crest Boulevard, Garner, NC 27529
Call: 866-526-0879 Email UsAbberlyPlace018@myLTSMail.com View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

Apartments Raleigh NC Blog

Garner, Raleigh, NC: One of the Best Places to Live in North Carolina

Joseph Coupal - Friday, May 05, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCKnown as the Tarheel State, North Carolina is the 10th largest state in the U.S. and had a population of over 9.7 million in 2012. It contains a diversity of geographical features and is divided into three sections. The mountains are in the west, the Piedmont is in the middle and the coastal plains are in the east. Its central location on the Atlantic Coast, mild weather and economic diversity make it a great place to call home. Also, its two largest metropolitan areas of Raleigh and Charlotte are among the top 10 fastest-growing in the country. Let’s take a look at some of the best places to live in North Carolina.

Raleigh:

Second only to Charlotte in population, Raleigh is the capital of North Carolina. It has a lot to offer with all of the attractions of a large city, but in a more laid-back setting with plenty of natural beauty. Raleigh has historical sites, museums, live shows and is the home of NC State University. It’s also an excellent place for economic opportunities and ranked No. 1 on Forbes’ list of the Best Places for Business and Careers in 2014.

For more information on apartments near Raleigh, NC in Garner, contact Abberly Place.

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Livability.com


Should Millennials Buy Homes? Maybe Not – Garner, NC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 28, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCAs the old saying goes, landlords get rich and renters stay poor. But this may not be true anymore.

On the other side of the debate are housing experts who have told The Wall Street Journal that, in the shadow of the Great Recession, the stigma of renting has faded.

It used to be that if you were an adult and didn’t own your own home, you were kind of a bum— but that image has been “blown into a million pieces.” In an era of stagnant wages, tepid job growth and soaring student debt, just 35 percent of Americans under age 35 owned their homes in the third quarter of 2016.

Should you rent or own your home? It’s an age-old question that doesn’t always yield a straight answer.

The unsatisfying advice: It’s complicated. Perhaps the most important factor in the rent-vs-buy calculus is how long you plan to stay in one place.

The five-year rule: In general, housing experts say, if you plan to live in a property for less than five years, you’re wiser to rent. That’s because expenses such as closing costs and real estate commissions wipe out the modest appreciation you enjoy. If you’re going to stay for 10 years, you’ll almost certainly gain by owning.

Here’s a partial list of the cons of homeownership:

Con: You’re responsible for property taxes and insurance.

When you rent, those expenses are part of your monthly payment, and your landlord worries about them. While Florida’s property taxes are modest compared to other states, you can expect to pay about 2 percent of the value of your home every year.

Con: You’re on the hook for repairs.

Kitchens and bathrooms don’t last forever, and a kitchen redo can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. Roofs, windows and air conditioners wear out over time. Replacing these costs thousands of dollars. Appliances break, and you’re on the hook for them, too. If you’re a renter, maintenance is the landlord’s problem.

Con: Owning makes you less mobile.

If you’re tied down by a property here, you might not grab that lucrative job offer somewhere else.

Con: The financial benefits of owning are real, but they’re often overstated.

Here is a sobering example of paying $1,500 a month in rent for 30 years. You’ll blow $540,000 with nothing to show for it. How much will you have if you buy? Here’s a very rough example, with no adjustments for inflation and appreciation: Say you take the same $1,500 a month and apply it to a $250,000 house, with a $200,000 mortgage at 4.25 percent. You’ll spend $984 a month on principal and interest, and the other $516 a month might (or might not) cover property taxes, insurance, lawn care, pest control, the occasional pressure cleaning and those inevitable visits by plumbers, electricians and carpenters. Over the 30-year life of the mortgage, you’ll replace the roof twice, the AC twice, repaint the house three times, buy enough replacement appliances to fill a small warehouse, and you’ll renovate the kitchen and bathrooms, all of which’ll cost you $100,000. And don’t forget that $50,000 down payment you made back when you were young. You will have paid the same $540,000 over 30 years, and you’ll have a net gain of $100,000 to show for it.

Not bad, but certainly not hedge fund money.

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC contact Abberly Place.

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Real Time


North Carolina is One of America’s Cheapest States to Live – Garner, NC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 20, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCCNBC scored all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Cost of living is one of the key categories of competitiveness, worth a possible 75 points toward a state's overall Top States score.

This year some states were tied. But North Carolina ranked high on the list .

#5 North Carolina

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC contact Abberly Place.

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CNBC


It May be Better to Rent, No Matter What the Numbers Say – Garner, NC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 14, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCIf you're wondering whether you're better off financially renting or buying a home, you can easily find an app for that.

Mortgage calculators all let you input the relevant numbers to determine which option makes more economic sense.

But studies and numbers don't always tell the whole story, and the cheapest option in a state isn't always the cheapest option for an individual.

You shouldn't buy if it doesn't fit your lifestyle. If it's really important to you to be going on exotic vacations ... it might be better to rent. Renting is also ideal for someone whose life is unsettled or a person who expects to relocate in a short time.

You don't want to buy if you don't plan to stay put for a while. In most markets, it's going to take around five years to offset the cost of buying.

In the short term, buying nearly always costs more. There's the down payment and mortgage closing costs, plus whatever money you spend to customize the house and get it ready for you. Then factor in the regular costs of homeownership, including homeowners insurance, property taxes and repair costs, and that can add up to a big chunk of change in the first few years of owning a home.

It's always more expensive in the short run to own rather than rent.

But if you crunch the numbers and they say buying a home is the right move, should you? Not always. Here are three good reasons not to buy a house, even if the all apps and calculators say you should.

You Don't Want the Responsibility

If you own a home, fixing anything that breaks is your responsibility. That could be an easy and inexpensive fix, such as calling a plumber to repair a leaky toilet, or a complicated and costly repair, such as replacement of the water and sewer lines from your home to the street.

When you buy a house, the first thing you discover is your landlord isn't going to fix the water heater when it breaks. Are you entirely ready for the requirements?

Not only do you need to have the money to make the repairs, you need to have the skill to find and negotiate with contractors and repair people. It's a lot of responsibility. Everyone should not buy a house. there are people who are emotionally not ready for it.

Your Life Plans Are in Flux

Even when buying seems cheaper than renting, you end up spending more if you sell quickly because of the costs of buying and selling. Buying a home then moving six months later to take a new job or get married can be costly.

The "in and out" costs are estimated at 10 percent of the home's value, though that varies by home and location. If appreciation is 3 percent a year, it will take you four years to break even, if you didn't spend any significant money on improvements or repairs.

The Great Recession also was a good reminder that there is no guarantee real estate will rise in value. People who bought or refinanced homes at the peak of the market in 2006 found themselves trapped in homes that were worth less, sometimes much less, than they owed on their mortgages. If they sold, they would have had to pay the lender tens of thousands of dollars.

Houses are selling quickly now in most cities and are expected to continue gaining value in 2017, but that's not always the case. If you invest in the stock market, you can sell your assets and have your cash in a few days. Real estate has a much longer time frame.

People whose lives are uncertain may not want to buy. Owning a home could make it harder to relocate for a better job, engage in long-term travel, care for aging parents out of state or unite with long-distance lover. Think hard about your current lifestyle and how it may evolve in the near future before you sign on the dotted line.

You Won't Have Any Savings After You Buy

People often forget that the down payment and closing costs are just the beginning when you buy a house or condo. Even homes in solid condition need maintenance and repair, from painting to new roofs to new appliances.

Every homeowner has a story, often multiple stories, of air conditioners and furnaces that needed replacing six months after they moved in, burst pipes that flooded the basement and washers that stopped forever in midcycle. Annual home maintenance and repairs easily can run 1 to 4 percent of the cost of the home, according to several real estate websites and Freddie Mac.

Houses are expensive and things break. You need to have a healthy emergency fund and be able to add to it.

Some lenders require homeowners to have savings as a condition of approving their mortgages. Even if your lender doesn't, you don't want to spend your last cent buying a home, especially if you'll be stretching to pay the mortgage, taxes and homeowners insurance.

You don't want to come out of the process of buying without at least three months of savings.

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC, contact Abberly Place.

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Yahoo! Finance


One of the Best States To Retire in is North Carolina – Garner, Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 06, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCMany of us long for a retirement that will feel like going on a permanent vacation. But before we buy that beach bungalow, box up our stuff and break out the Costco-sized wine spritzers, a reality check may be in order.

Bankrate’s latest ranking of the best and worst states to retire finds the fun-in-the-sun places often associated with retirement may have drawbacks as we face aging issues and our savings dwindle. Retiree meccas like Florida and Arizona don’t come close to cracking our top 10.

#20. North Carolina

Many do want to retire somewhere else - It’s no myth that many people dream of moving in retirement. A new Bankrate survey shows that 47% of Americans would consider relocating when they retire. Higher-earning households and younger people are more likely to say so than everyone else.

According to our poll, Americans’ priorities for a retirement haven suggest they’re giving a lot of thought to practical considerations like cost of living and health care.

How we rate the states

To rank the states according to what people say they want in retirement, we pull together data on these eight criteria:

  • Cost of living
  • Healthcare quality
  • Crime
  • Cultural vitality
  • Weather
  • Taxes
  • Senior citizens’ overall well-being
  • The prevalence of other seniors

Two of our categories are new: cultural vitality (whether residents can find fun stuff to do) and the prevalence of other seniors (whether it would be easy to find other retirees to hang out with).

We weight the factors based on the importance they were given in our survey.

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC, contact Abberly Place.

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Bankrate


It is Cheaper to Rent than Own in Every State, Including Yours - Garner, NC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 31, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCOwning a home is often considered the American dream — and it’s an expensive one. Homeowners in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., pay from 33% to 93% more for housing each month than do renters living in the same state, according to a new NerdWallet analysis.

But many homeowners reap benefits that you can’t get from renting. The equity you build can be leveraged for loans that can be used to improve the home and boost its value or be used in financial emergencies.

While renting can’t offer thosefinancial benefits, it’s cheaper to rent on a month-to-month basis. If you’re wondering how to save money for a down payment, renting can help you build that nest egg — but in extremely expensive or competitive markets, renting might be better for the long haul.

To determine the monthly homeownership premium — the additional cost of owning instead of renting, expressed as a percentage — NerdWallet compared 2015 American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau for the median gross rent and median homeownership cost in each state and Washington, D.C. Median gross rent includes the costs of monthly rent and utilities for all kinds of rental properties, and median homeownership cost includes monthly mortgage payments, real estate taxes, insurance and utilities. This comparison doesn’t include the down payment required to buy a home, which is traditionally 20% of the home price for conventional mortgages, but is lower for FHA or VA loans.

Key takeaways

  • Owning is more expensive everywhere. Across all 50 states and Washington, D.C., it costs more each month to own a home than to rent. The median cost people pay nationwide to own a home is 54% more than the median cost to rent each month.
  • The smallest difference is still a third more to own.
  • In some states, the cost of owning far eclipses renting.

State: North Carolina
Homeownership Premium: 49%
Median Monthly Cost to Own: $1234
Median Monthly Cost to Rent: $827
Difference: $407

For more information on apartments in Mooresville, NC, contact Abberly Green.

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NerdWallet


In Raleigh, Garner, NC You Can Live Like Royalty for Less Than 70K

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 24, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCMaking a good living is one thing, living well is another. And that often boils down to where you choose to live.

The best places are likely the ones where you can find a job, earn a good salary and buy a nice home. In a 2016 report, job-hunting site Glassdoor calculated the top spots where your pay will go furthest, based on salaries and home values. To do so, the jobs site came up with a cost of living ratio — a city's median base salary divided by its median home value.

Noticeably missing are some of America's biggest cities. While you can certainly earn more in hubs like New York and San Francisco, few people can afford to buy a house or an apartment there.

We came up with the top 25 places where an average paycheck goes a very long way and the quality of life is great. (A higher ratio number is better.)

25. Raleigh, NC

Cost of living ratio: 30%
Median base salary: $62,000
Number of open jobs: 22,339

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC, near Raleigh, contact Abberly Place.

To see the whole article, click here.

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CNBC


Best Places to Live in America – Raleigh, NC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 17, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCWhen deciding where to put down roots, many factors are in the eye of the beholder, such as climate, politics, or proximity to extended family. Other aspects are coveted by nearly everybody: affordable housing, access to well-paying jobs, a low cost of living, good schools, and quality healthcare. In its recently released ranking of the best places to live in America, U.S. News & World Report gathered data on these crucial components for the 100 most populous US cities.

They then categorized the data into five indexes for each city — job market, value, quality of life, desirability, and net migration — to definitively rank these major metro areas.

Scores for "value," a blend of annual household income and cost of living, and "quality of life," which accounts for crime, college readiness, commute, and other factors, are included below on a 10-point scale, as well as the city’s population and median annual salary.

4. Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina

Population: 1,714,629
Median annual salary: $47,430
Quality of life: 7.4
Overall value: 6.9

Raleigh-Durham and Chapel Hill are collectively known as the Triangle, an area anchored by its foundation in research and tech. The Triangle employs nearly 40,000 residents at companies like IBM, SAS Institute Inc., and Cisco Systems as well as surrounding colleges Duke, North Carolina State, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A strong job market coupled with a burgeoning microbrewery and dining scene draws 80 new residents every day, said a local expert.

For more information on apartments near Raleigh, NC in Garner, contact Abberly Place.

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businessinsider.com


Best States for Business: North Carolina is High on the LIst

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 10, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCWe score all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from a broad and diverse array of business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. States receive points based on their rankings in each metric. Then we separate those metrics into 10 broad categories, weighted based on how frequently each is used as a selling point in state economic development marketing materials. That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves.

Our study is not an opinion survey. We rely on tangible numbers to gauge each state's performance, scoring all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, using publicly available data.

Here are our categories and this year's weightings.

Workforce - We rate states based on the education level of their workforce, the numbers of available employees, and the states' demonstrated abilities to retain college-educated workers. We measure workforce productivity based on each state's economic output per job. We look at the relative success of each state's worker training programs in placing their participants in jobs. We also consider union membership and the states' right-to-work laws.

Cost of Doing Business - We look at the competitiveness of each state's tax climate, as well as state-sponsored incentives that can lower the cost of doing business. Utility costs can add up to a huge expense for business, and they vary widely by state. We also consider the cost of wages, as well as rental costs for office and industrial space.

Infrastructure - We measure the vitality of each state's transportation system by the value of goods shipped by air, waterways, roads and rail. We look at the availability of air travel in each state, the quality of the roads and bridges, and the time it takes to commute to work.

Economy - We look at economic growth, job creation, consumer spending, and the health of the residential real estate market. We measure each state's fiscal health by looking at its credit ratings and outlook, as well as its overall budget picture. We also consider the number of major corporations headquartered in each state.

Quality of Life - We score the states on livability, including several factors, such as the crime rate; inclusiveness, such as antidiscrimination protections; the quality of health care; the level of health insurance coverage and the overall health of the population. We evaluate local attractions, parks and recreation, as well as environmental quality.

Technology & Innovation - We evaluate the states on their support for innovation, the number of patents issued to their residents and the record of high-tech business formation. We also consider federal health, science and agricultural research grants to the states.

Education - Higher-education institutions offer companies a source to recruit new talent, as well as a partner in research and development. We consider the number of higher-education institutions in each state, as well as long-term funding trends for higher education. We look at several measures of K–12 education, including test scores, class size and spending. We also look digital and lifelong learning opportunities in each state.

Business Friendliness - But we grade the states on the freedom their legal and regulatory frameworks provide for business.

Cost of Living- The cost of living helps drive the cost of doing business. From housing to food and energy, wages go further when the cost of living is low.

Access to Capital - We look at venture capital investments by state, as well as small-business lending on a relative basis.

North Carolina is #5 on the list of America's Top States for Business.

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC contact Abberly Place.

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cnbc.com


Tips for Renting Apartments in Garner, NC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 03, 2017

Abberly Place, Garner, NCThe checklist for in an apartment isn’t limited to things like how much the rent is and the close the apartment or house is to work. In order to ensure a safe and comfortable living arrangement, all other aspects have to be considered before signing a lease.

No matter where you decide to live, it’s best to consider what’s close to the property and what transportation is available. If there are restaurants or shopping centers within walking distance, or relatively close by, it’ll be easier for you to buy what you need. However, it’s important to also consider forms of public transportation.

As far as the actual property goes, it’s critical to pay attention to the actual building and the lease. Always visit the apartment in person as opposed to simply viewing pictures and reading descriptions; this allows you to see if the place is in good enough condition to live in, and make sure you feel safe. It’s dangerous to decide on a place without knowing if you are fully comfortable with the apartment, landlord, and neighborhood. As far as the lease, read through it thoroughly and carefully. If you have any questions at all, or don’t understand something, it’s critical to ask questions to avoid being locked into a bad situation. As a safety net, it’s also a good idea to get everything in writing, from a hard-copy of the lease to paper copies of any repair requests, in order to avoid possible disputes.

In terms of roommates, it goes without saying that you should choose roommates that will be able to pay their fair share of rent; and that there is no conflict between roommates. This makes the off-campus experience better. Something that should also be thought about is the possibility of getting renter’s insurance, if it isn’t already required; this also functions as a safety net in order to make sure you are covered in case of fire, theft, or any sort of damage.

For more information on apartments in Garner, NC, contact Abberly Place.

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uncmirror.com



Abberly Place Apartment Homes

500 Abberly Crest Boulevard, Garner, NC 27529

Call: 866-526-0879
Email UsAbberlyPlace018@myLTSMail.com
View Map

Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$937-$1,361